Nortek Vector with IMU helps researchers keep up the quality of Japan’s waters

Although Nortek’s Vector velocimeter is more accustomed to highly energetic environments such as those found in surf zones, researchers in Japan have recently showed that it is equally at home in much more gentle — yet just as challenging — conditions.
Nortek Vector with IMU helps researchers keep up the quality of Japan’s waters

Aerial photo of Tono Dam and its reservoir.

A team from Tottori University, led by Dr. Hiroshi Yajima, has been using the Nortek Vector in a study aimed at improving Japan’s fresh water reservoir’s operational efficiency and water quality. Many of the world’s manmade reservoirs present stratified conditions, where water at depth may have a significantly different temperature and oxygen content than water closer to the surface. This condition varies throughout the year and between different basins.  Reservoir operators therefore withdraw water from different depths depending on these conditions. But, because of the temporal and spatial variability in these conditions, knowing the right depth from where to draw water is an imprecise endeavor: too much cold (or warm) water can negatively affect the fauna, flora and the quality of the water that is distributed to the population.


Read the full case study here.